Big Trouble In Little Blender – 1.2 Initial UV Unwrapping Notes

blender-socket

Notes made during my first attempt a UV Editing on Blender.

These probably won’t be useful for anyone other than myself. I’m planning on building models as required, rather than in one lump – Which means I’ll probably forget everything in the meantime – To avoid that as much as possible, I’m hoping to use this as a reference point – Allowing me to learn new tools & features of blender; rather than constantly relearning the same tools.

Apologies for any obvious mistakes or omissions – These notes were made as I was learning, and not necessarily as I had learnt.

blender-uvunwrap-alt

Select UV editing from the Screen Layout pulldown at the top of the window – This will show uv window on left & edit window on the right.

 

Setup Environment:

In edit window
Select Limit Selection To Visible icon in bottom left (right of faces icon, two squares with squares for corners).
Select & drag the add window lines in the top right of the user perspective window – & pull left – this will create a new sub window…
…In this window, select the Editor Type pull-down (bottom left – cube with up & down arrow) & select Outliner.
Resize windows as required.
Ensure – show texture is active – click Viewport Shading pulldown at bottom thee window (circle icon) & select Texture.

In UV window:
On the right hand side of the window – select & drag the Grease Pencil window to the right (until it is removed from the screen).
On the left hand side – select & pull the plus tab – This will initially just show grease pencil again, however once faces have UV settings applied, it will display translate/rotate/scale buttons.
Click the UV Selection and display mode: Island icon – this is an icon with two rectangles – right one is orange – may need to resize window to make this visible.

 

Edit UV’s:

In edit window:
Change to edit mode – Using the Mode Select pull down menu at the bottom of the screen
Select the Selection Type – Face (icon of cube with one face selected).
Select everything (press A).
From the menu’s at the bottom of the edit window: Mesh->UV Unwrap->[select unwrap method here] – unwraps model for UV painting.

In UV window:
ALT-O – Opens file explorer to add texture.
Add texture – this will apply the same texture to all faces – Otherwise the texture will need to be reapplied for each group.

In edit window – For individual faces/groups of faces:
Change to edit mode – from Mode Select pull down menu at the bottom of the screen
Choose Selection Type – Face (icon of cube with one face selected).
Use right mouse button to select individual faces – ctrl + right mouse button multiple faces
From the menu’s at the bottom of the edit window: Mesh->UV Unwrap->[select unwrap method here] – this will unwrap the selected faces.

In UV window:
Select everything (press A) or right mouse click for individual faces.
Use translate/rotate/scale in the Mesh Tools column to move and position faces on texture
right mouse button to select faces.
– pressing translate/rotate/scale will select their faces (e.g. after pressing scale, moving the mouse will rescale the selected faces without needing to press the left or right mouse button)
– once complete click left mouse button to place/apply.

 


 

Next post: 1.3 Initial Animation Notes

Last post: 1.1 Initial Modeling Notes

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Big Trouble In Little Blender – 1.1 Initial Modeling Notes

blender-socket

 

My last attempts at 3D modelling were for the XNA games I wrote – 2-3 years ago.
Back then I was using the cut-down version of SoftImage that was offered free to XNA subscribers.

I was never that skilled & what I remember is pretty patchy – So moving onto Blender has provided a steep learning curve. Fortunately the models I’m putting together a pretty simple; allowing me to learn as I build.

I’ve made some notes from my first attempt (which I’ve copied below).
These probably won’t be useful for anyone other than myself. I’m planning on building models as required, rather than in one lump – Which means I’ll probably forget everything in the mean time – To avoid that as much as possible, I’m hoping to use this as a reference point – Allowing me to learn new tools & features of blender; rather than constantly relearning the same tools.

Apologies for any obvious mistakes or omissions – These notes were made as I was learning, and not necessarily as I had learnt.

 

blender-edit

 

Useful site: Blender Reference Manual

Use default view.

Currently using the ‘Blender Game‘ rendering engine.

Mesh Create – On the left, create tab to add meshes
Mesh Tools – On the left, Tools tab to manipulate – translate, rotate, scale etc…

Outlier
On the top of the right column
This is the scene tree – showing models, animations, etc.

Mesh Values
To the left of the outlier, there should be a ‘+‘ tab
Pull this out to show specific values for mesh translation, rotation, scale, etc..
These values are only visible in ‘Edit Mode‘ (see below)
In the main modeling window:

Mouse Buttons
Left mouse button moves the 3D cursor – try not to use the left mouse button
Middle mouse button (pressed & move) – rotates the scene
Middle mouse button (scroll wheel) – zoom in/out
Right mouse button selects (e.g click on a mesh to pick up and move the mesh)

Mesh view Shortcuts
Note – to rotate around a specific object/mesh – press ‘.‘ (full stop on the number pad)
Ensure NUMBLOCK is on.

front/left/top windows are not automatically visible.
To save screen real estate – shortcuts for the main window are:
NUMBLOCK ON &
1 = Front view
7 = Top view
3 = Side view
0 = Camera view

Mode Select
At the bottom of the screen, there is a pull down menu.
When modelling there are two main modes;
Object mode: moves & positions meshes
Edit mode: edit faces/vertices/edges etc…

Selection Type –
With ‘edit mode‘ selected, at the bottom of the screen there are three icons
cube with a small orange dot – select this to edive vertices/nodes
cube with orange line – select this to edit edges
cube with one face orange – select this to edit faces/polygons

Once selected
right click to select specific edge, vertices,face
shift-right click to select multipoles edges, vertices,face, etc.
Useful Shortcuts – Press;
A – Select/Deselect everything
Z – Toggle wireframe on/off
CTRL-I – Inverse selection
K – knife tool, Used to add edges.
(use left mouse button to add nodes)
SPACE to save
GG (G twice) – Reposition a vertex.
E – Extends edge, vertices, face (whichever is selected when E is pressed)
W – With an edge, vertices, face selected this opens the ‘Specials’ menu – subdivides face/bevel, etc…

 


 

Next post: 1.2 Initial UV Unwrapping Notes

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Adventures in Unity – 2.6 Pause & Resume

Official_unity_logo

 

Whenever a bonus is collected a message box is displayed and the game pauses momentarily.

It’s not a function of the game I particularly like; and I probably wouldn’t use it in the final release – But, since the point of this project is to try things out & help me learn Unity, I figured I’d try and replicate it anyway.

 

Bounder3b

 

When displaying the message box, the entire game should pause – including problematic functions like particles/physics/etc.. things controlled by the Unity engine.

Google found me a solution pretty quickly – Time.timeScale

To freeze the game set Time.timeScale = 0 – To resume the game set Time.timeScale = 1.

Time.timeScale is a float variable.
Every loop, Unity multiplies Time.deltaTime against Time.timeScale.
This determines the speed of the game – For anything that references Time.deltaTime – Any update that doesn’t reference Time.deltaTime will be unaffected (Though you really should be using Time.deltaTime).

It’s usually used to pause games & tends to be set with values 0 or 1.
Though it can be used to dynamically slow/speed up gameplay – values higher than 1 may legally require that yakety sax be played at all times.

 


 

With everything paused; the next problem was how to animate the message box – (fade in, display for x seconds, fade out).

I can run the animation without using Time.DeltaTime – But then I won’t receive any of the benefits.

Another quick google search identified the solution – A homebrew Time.deltaTime using replacement using Time.realtimeSinceStartup.

Unity documentation explains ‘realtimeSinceStartup returns the time since startup, not affected by Time.timeScale. realtimeSinceStartup also keeps increasing while the player is paused (in the background). Using realtimeSinceStartup is useful when you want to pause the game by setting Time.timeScale to zero, but still want to be able to measure time somehow.

I use The replacement Time.deltaTime as a timer;

  IEnumerator PauseTimer(float delay)
  {

     float start = Time.realtimeSinceStartup;
     timerComplete = false;

     while (Time.realtimeSinceStartup < start + delay)
     {
          yield return null;
     }

     timerComplete = true;

}

 

Bounder2a.gif

 


 

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